THE NEW YORK LANDMARKS CONSERVANCY AWARDS 16 SACRED SITES GRANTS TO HISTORIC RELIGIOUS PROPERTIES THROUGHOUT NEW YORK STATE

 

Smithfield Presbyterian Church in Amenia

Receives Sacred Sites Grant

 

The New York Landmarks Conservancy has announced 16 Sacred Sites Grants totaling $241,500 awarded to historic religious properties throughout New York State, including a $6,000 Sacred Sites Grant to Smithfield Presbyterian Church in Amenia to help fund window restoration.

Smithfield Presbyterian Church was founded in 1750. The timber-frame, temple-front Greek Revival-style church was erected in 1847-48 and designed by Nathaniel Lockwood.  The symmetrical façade has four massive ionic columns supporting the entry porch. The sanctuary contains historic wood pews, heavily articulated plaster cornice, and a late 19th-century pipe organ.  The congregation reaches about 100 people a year through various community activities.

The Conservancy’s Sacred Sites program has assisted more than 750 congregations across New York State since its founding in 1986 with grants totaling over $12 million.  These grants have contributed to more than $740 million in total restoration projects.  The program is one of a few in the country aiding landmark religious institutions and the only one assisting an entire state.

“Religious buildings anchor communities providing a sense of history and place.  They are among our most important landmarks,” said Peg Breen, President, The New York Landmarks Conservancy.  “Preserving them also allows congregations to continue to offer social service and cultural programs to their communities.”

The New York Landmarks Conservancy

The New York Landmarks Conservancy has led the effort to preserve and protect New York City’s architectural legacy for 45 years.  Since its founding, the Conservancy has loaned and granted more than $50 million, which has leveraged more than $1 billion in 1,550 restoration projects throughout New York, revitalizing communities, providing economic stimulus and supporting local jobs.  The Conservancy has also offered countless hours of pro bono technical advice to building owners, both nonprofit organizations and individuals.  The Conservancy’s work has saved more than a thousand buildings across the City and State, protecting New York’s distinctive architectural heritage for residents and visitors alike today, and for future generations.  For more information, please visit www.nylandmarks.org.